• Noto Style
  • Search by area
  • Wajima City and Anamizu Town

Wajima City and Anamizu Town

Shiroyone Senmaida (Terraced Rice Paddies)

Geometric patterns
Reaching to the sea


Location: Shiroyone-machi, Wajima City

■Row upon row of rice paddies, covering the sloping coastlands
As you travel on National Highway 249 from Wajima towards Sosogi, you can see terraced rice fields, some large and some small, covering the sloping foothills like a row of steps. These are the Shiroyone Senmaida - 1,000 Terraced Rice Paddies. On the steep slopes, they seem to rise up out of the ocean. Of these paddies, 1,004 are included in the site designated as a Place of Scenic Beauty. Such beautiful geometric patterns against the backdrop of blue seas can only be found in Noto. In summer, the calm water in the paddies reflects the sunlight, sparkling like a thousand mirrors, while in autumn the ripening ears of rice dye the paddies a golden hue. The paddies show a different face in each of the four seasons.

■Japanese scenery maintained through the cooperative efforts of many people
Because each of the paddies in the Shiroyone Senmaida is so small, large farming equipment cannot be used. From planting to harvesting, all work is done by hand. Everyone cooperates in the overwhelming tasks involved, including digging up the paddies, planting the rice, and harvesting it. Japan’s natural beauty is protected by the harmony and souls of men.
 

   

Daihonzan Sojiji Soin Temple

An ancient temple of the Soto school of Buddhism
that prospered greatly 


Address: 1-18 Monzen, Monzen-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-42-0005
Hours: 8:00-17:00
Fee: Visitors 400 yen
Closed: Open every day

This temple of the Soto school of Buddhism was opened in the first year of the Genkou era (1321). At one time, it flourished as the head temple of the sect, with 16,000 branch temples across the nation. In Meiji 31 (1898), almost the entire seven-structure temple compound was destroyed by fire, and the head temple function was relocated to Yokohama. Accordingly, this temple became the Soin (father temple). Even now, monks continue their austere practices inside the temple grounds.

   

Nanso Museum

A museum featuring valuable objects
handed down by Noto’s most powerful clan 


Address: Machino Machi Higashi Oono, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-32-0166 
Hours: 8:30-17:30
Fee: Entrance fee 700 yen
Closed: Open every day
 
From before the Kamakura period to the current day, there have been 25 generations of Oku-Noto’s old family, the Minami family. The heads of each successive generation prospered through forestry, agriculture, the salt industry, and foreign trade, and the items collected and handed down from generation to generation are on display in this museum. Treasures such as paintings by Tawaraya Sotatsu and Maruyama Okyo, ceramics by Kakiemon I and Nonomura Ninsei, and other top quality items are lined up for viewing.

   

Tokikuni House

A wealthy farmer’s house that hides the romance of history


After his defeat in the battle between the Genji and Heike clans, Taira no Tokitada was exiled to Suzu on the Noto Peninsula, and remained there. The Tokikuni House was founded by his offspring, Taira no Tokikuni. During the time of Tozaemon Tokiyasu (the 12th head of the Tokikuni Family), Senmatsu, the second son, began a branch family, which he named Shimotokikuni. Being dedicated to the Emperor Antoku, who was killed in the battle of Dan-no-ura, the Shimotokikuni House is also called Noto Antoku Tenno Goushi Tokikuni House.
 
■Head Household Kamitokikuni House
Address: 13-4 Machino Machi Minami Tokikuni, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-32-0171
Hours: 8:30-17:30 (-17:00 from October to June)
Fee: Entrance Fee 500 yen
Closed: Open every day

 This is Noto's oldest thatched roof private house, and is an important national cultural property. It took the carpenters who built Kyoto's Higashi Honganji Temple 28 years to finish. The grand scale of the house and the elaborate construction, not to mention the beautiful garden, make this one sight you don't want to miss.
 
■Noto Antoku Tenno Goushi Tokikuni House (Shimotokikuni House)
Address: 2-1 Machino Machi Nishi Tokikuni, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-32-0075
Hours: 8:30-17:00 (-16:00 from December to March)
Fee: Entrance Fee 600 yen
Closed: Weekdays during the winter (If you call and make a reservation a week in advance, they will open it for you)
 
This thatched house was constructed during the Edo period, and has a long pedigree, having been named an important national cultural property. The 15th head of the family logged trees on his own mountain, and construction was carried out by the 16th and 17th heads of the family. This construction lasted through two generations taking a total of 50 years. In 2005, repair work was finished that restored the house to very close to its original splendor.

   

Ishikawa Wajima Urushi Art Museum

An introduction to techniques and art in the world of lacquer ware


Address: 11 Shijukari, Mitomori-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-22-9788
Website: http://www.city.wajima.ishikawa.jp/art/
Hours: 9:00 – 17:00 (Last entry at 16:30)
Fee: Entry 600 yen
Closed: When exhibitions are being changed; from Dec. 29 – 31
Parking: Available
Access: About 10 minutes by Noranke Bus Umi Course (coastal route) from Michi no Eki Wajima Furatto Homu;

about 30 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange

 

■Immerse yourself in the world of splendid lacquer ware

This museum, rare in Japan, is devoted entirely to lacquer ware. It doesn’t just focus on Wajima and other Japanese lacquer; collected here are examples of fine lacquer ware from all over the world. Here you’ll find lacquer ware you’d never usually see – fine pieces produced by artisans of the highest skill and pieces so beautiful you won’t be able to suppress sighs of delight. Permanent exhibits include pieces created by national living treasures and contemporary artists, as well as examples of lacquer ware from other countries. In addition, special exhibitions are held, which change every two to three months. Lacquer ware, one of Japan’s traditional handicrafts, is receiving exposure to the outside world. In one exhibition you must see, the production process for Wajima lacquer, which involves over 120 operations, is explained with samples of work on display. You’ll come away with a much deeper understanding of Wajima lacquer. The external appearance of the building is based on that of the Shosoin treasure house at Todaiji temple, a symbol of Japanese culture that houses a number of artistic handicrafts from the Nara period. Behind the museum, you’ll find a large green area where you can rest.


   

Gallery Waichi

A cooperative effort by lacquer artisans living in Wajima City, who have given their artistic expression free rein to create these exquisite lacquer ware pieces


Address: 4-42 Waichi, Kawai-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-23-8601
Hours: 9:00 – evening
Closed: Tuesdays (May be closed at other times)
Parking: Use the Asaichi parking lot
Access: About a 10 minute walk from the Michi no Eki Wajima Furatto Homu; about 20 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange

■The theme is "lacquer ware that can be used in everyday life."
This gallery is located on the Waichi Shopping Street, which connects Asaichi Street and Juzo shrine. The building, which harmonizes with the street, is a renovated merchant house that is over 100 years old. The inside of the gallery is decorated in styles that are characteristic of Wajima and Ishikawa Prefecture. The walls are papered in handmade Wajima washi (Japanese paper) containing the earth of rice paddies and the floor is made of oyaishi stones. The display shelves are built from ate (hiba), the symbol tree of Ishikawa Prefecture.
On display are lacquer ware pieces created by Wajima artists, who have given free rein to their imaginations. Production of Wajima lacquer usually involves many operations, each performed by specialized artisans – such as kijishi (wood turners), who make the wooden cores, and nushi (lacquer painters), who apply the lacquer. However, the items here are created by artists who perform all the steps themselves, creating the objects as they envision them.
From bowls and plates to ornaments, everything here is meant to be used every day, not preserved carefully in a box. Many designs cleverly blend East and West to create items that fit into modern lifestyles.
 

   

Noto Nakai Cast Metal Museum

This museum offers explanations of the once-flourishing cast metal trade in Anamizu’s Nakai district.
Important articles are also on display.


Address: Ro-110 Nakai, Anamizu-machi, Hosu-gun, Ishikawa Prefecture
Phone: 0768-56-1231
Website: http://www.town.anamizu.ishikawa.jp/anamizu/anamizu_kanko/nakiimonokan/imonokan01.jsp
Hours: 8:30 – 17:00 (Last entry at 16:30)
Fee: Entry 300 yen, High school students and younger 150 yen
Parking: Available
Access: About 10 minutes by car from the Noto Yuryo (Noto Toll Road) Anamizu Interchange
 
■Conveying the history of Nakai metal casting
For about 800 years, from the 12th century to the beginning of the 20th century, metal casting flourished in Nakai. During the Edo period, the Kaga domain had a monopoly on salt sales, and Nakai prospered by producing shiogama (brine pans) that were lent to coastal villages in Noto. Later, however, with the arrival of strong, cheap pans from Takaoka, Nakai’s industry began a slow decline. In 1924, the industry shut down.
There are two exhibition rooms in the museum. Commentary is available that explains Nakai metal casting, mainly focusing on its relationships with the Matsugi Clan, a noble family in Kyoto that controlled Japan’s metal casters, and with the Kaga domain. A number of examples of works by Nakai’s casters and ancient documents are also on display.
Many shrines and temples are located in the seashore community near the Nakai Cast Metal Museum. A stone-paved path called Satori no Michi wends its way among them, steeped in history and verdant greenery. Meandering along this path is a highly recommended activity.

   

Go Nagai Wonderland Museum

A museum devoted to Go Nagai, a manga artist born in Wajima who created many hit manga series.


Address: 1-123 Kawai-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-23-0715
Website: http://www.go-wonderland.jp/index.html
Hours: 9:00 – 17:00 (Last entry 16:30) Entrance
Entrance Fee: Adults 500 yen, Children 200 yen
Parking: Available (Use the Asaichi parking lot)
Access: A 10-minute walk from Michi no Eki Wajima Furatto Homu;
about 20 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange

■A condensed introduction to the world of anime
Go Nagai is famous for such works as Devilman and Cutie Honey. In this museum, located in his hometown of Wajima, you can view such items as original pages from his manga and figures based on his manga characters. The front of the building features an illustration of some of Go Nagai’s most popular characters, a symbol of the museum drawn specially for the museum. There’s a library where you can read his manga on computers and a studio where a video showing how he draws his illustrations is screened. Even those who are experiencing Go Nagai’s world for the first time will find a lot to enjoy here. One exhibition not to be missed is the 1/9 scale figure of the famous Mazinger Z. It will stop anyone in their tracks!

   

The Urushi Amusement Nuritaro in Wajima

In one corner of this workshop where Wajima lacquer ware is produced and sold, you can decorate your own piece of lacquer ware.


Address: 1-95 Kawai-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-22-6040
Website: http://nuritaro.com/
Hours: 8:00 – 17:00
Fee: Entry is free
Parking: Available
Access: About a 15-minute walk from the Michi no Eki Wajima Furatto Homu; about 30 minutes by car from the Noto Yuryo (Noto Toll Road) Anamizu Interchange

■Feel like a master craftsman at this Wajima lacquer ware workshop
Located on a narrow road off Asaichi Street. In one corner of this workshop, where lacquer is applied to products after the undercoating process is finished, visitors can have the experience of decorating their own lacquer ware. For pieces to be decorated with makie, the lacquer is applied over pre-drawn designs, and the coloring powder is sprinkled on top of the lacquer using a tube. Select from about 50 prepared items to decorate, ranging from chopsticks (from 1,000 yen) to plates (from 2,500yen). Each item is a properly manufactured piece of Wajima lacquer ware. The decorating experience fee is included in the price of the item, providing excellent quality at a reasonable price. For those with confidence in their own artistic skills, it is also possible to decorate an item without the predrawn pattern. It is also possible to try your hand at gold-inlaid lacquer ware, where gold powder is placed in etched grooves. Take home a true one-of-a-kind souvenir of your trip with a piece of lacquer ware you’ve decorated yourself!

Choose from seven colors, and mix them according to your own tastes.
Choose from seven colors, and mix them according to your own tastes.
  You can also select from accessories such as pendants or hair ornaments.
You can also select from accessories such as pendants or hair ornaments.
  The construction of the lacquer room is also a must-see.
The construction of the lacquer room is also a must-see.

Wajima Asaichi (Morning Market)

About 200 stalls are lined up to sell the special products of Wajima.


Address: Kawai-machi Asaichi-dori Street, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-22-7653 (Wajima City Asaichi Association)
Hours: From around 8:00 – 12:00
Closed: The 10th and 25th of each month, Jan. 1 – 3
Parking: Use the Asaichi parking lot

■Search for souvenirs as you sample your way down the street.
The market began as a place where local people could barter. Fresh fish and vegetables, flowers, home-made pickles and folk crafts – a wide variety of products are available in this crowded market, open only in the morning. From tented stalls to simple straw mats, the style of the shops is as varied as the products. The sellers are mainly older Wajima women, famous for their hard-working ways. They sell fresh fish that they bid on at the fish market earlier the same morning and just-harvested vegetables.
The secrets to shopping here are buying in bulk, and bartering. First look around at a variety of different shops, and then try haggling with the ladies selling the products. After 11 a.m., the prices for the fresh fish start to drop, so that's a good time to start bargaining.
For souvenirs, look for anything from simple folk crafts made of straw to high-quality Wajima lacquer ware.
As you browse the stalls, enjoy steamed buns, grilled seafood on skewers and other light foods for sale at the morning market.

   

Noto Airport

Even when you’re not boarding an airplane, enjoy this Michi no Eki (roadside station). 


Address: Sue 10-11-1 Mii-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-26-2100
Website: http://www.noto-airport.jp/notosypher/www/index.jsp
Hours: 8:30 – 17:30 (The Travel Information Center in NOTO is open from 9:00 – 17:00)
Closed: Open every day
Parking: Available
Access: About 5 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange
 
■A Michi no Eki where airplanes come and go
Noto Airport joins Noto and Tokyo’s Haneda Airport. The airport itself is registered as a Michi no Eki. On the first floor, many people gather to buy the popular Noto Airport original soft-serve ice cream. There are apparently some people who say they must eat some before taking off! The Travel Information Center in NOTO is the tourist’s strongest ally. All the information pamphlets available are collected here.

On the second floor, you’ll find a shop selling a variety of Noto specialty items, from local sake and sweets to processed marine products and handicrafts. Have a bite to eat in the restaurant overlooking the runway. Before your flight, pass the time in the departure lounge, which serves as an event space between flights. Events are held here at irregular intervals, including dance and violin recitals by local residents. Noto Airport – it’s an airport, but at the same time, it’s a Michi no Eki that people can use and enjoy.
 
* A Michi no Eki is…a rest area on a national highway that is registered with the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. In addition to parking and restrooms, they contain stores that sell local specialty items, restaurants and other facilities, to make driving more fun.

   

Michi no Eki Wajima Furatto Homu

The Michi no Eki was built on the site of the former Noto Railway Wajima Station. 


Address: 20-1-131 Kawai-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-22-1503
Hours: 8:00-19:00
Closed: Open every day
Parking: Available
Access: About 20 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange
 
■The face of Wajima – both now and in the past 

In 2001, the Noto Railway Wajima Line was shut down. This Michi no Eki was built on the site of that line’s Wajima Station, the final stop. The pillars inside are finished with wipe lacquering, while the exterior features black roof tiles and lattice walls -- this prominent building has many things typical of Wajima. Behind the Tourist Information Center, part of the old station and platform still remain, and they tell a story of how people traveled by train back in those days. (The name of the Michi no Eki, Furatto Homu, is a play on the Japanese word for platform, puratto homu).
Although the building’s days as a train station are over, it still serves as a gateway to Wajima. It functions as a bus terminal for buses going to Kanazawa and Noto, and as a point of interaction for tourists and locals.
The adjacent product hall is a convenient location for shopping and looking for souvenirs. Noto specialty products, particularly those from Wajima, can be found here, including handicrafts and sweets. This too, is a typical Wajima-style building, with columns and floors made of wood from hiba trees (the symbol tree of Ishikawa Prefecture) from Noto.

 

* A Michi no Eki is…a rest area on a national highway that is registered with the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. In addition to parking and restrooms, they contain stores that sell local specialty items, restaurants and other facilities, to make driving more fun.


   

Wajima Kobo Nagaya (Wajima Atelier Row)

Here you can study the process of making Wajima-nuri (Wajima lacquer ware) and try your hand at decorating lacquer ware yourself.


Address: 4-66-1 Kawai-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-23-0011
Website: http://www.ringisland.jp/nagaya/
Hours: 9:00-18:00 (-17:00 from November to February)
Closed: Wednesdays (Except when Wednesday is on the 10th, 25th or a national holiday when a local-product market is being held
Parking: Available
Access: Located a 10-minute walk from the Michi no Eki Wajima Furatto Homu; 20 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange


■Here you can learn much more about Wajima and one of its special products, Wajima-nuri.
This location was formerly a set of row houses where many Wajima-nuri craftsmen lived, but it has been converted into ateliers and workshops for the craftsmen and shops selling lacquer ware. Craftsmen who are specialists in that process oversee each step of the process of creating Wajima-nuri. At each workshop, you can observe the various steps of the process and admire the skills of the artisans. After learning about the Wajima-nuri manufacturing process in the Information Workshop, move on to the Lacquer Ware Atelier. Here you will find a wide variety of lacquer ware items for sale, from simple tools for everyday life, such as chopsticks and bowls, to magnificent works of art.
It is also possible to try some of the steps in making lacquer ware yourself. For 2,500 yen, you can apply your own gold-inlay decoration (a technique known as chinkin) to a lacquer panel. In one hour and 30 minutes, you can create a lacquer panel that is unique in the world!

   

Wajima Hot Spring Footbath Yurari

This luxurious hot spring uses the gushing hot water just as it is. 


Address: 4-169 Kawai-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-23-1146 (Wajima City Hall Commerce Department Tourism Section)
Website: http://www.city.wajima.ishikawa.jp/kankou/yurari.html
Hours: 6:00 – 22:00; Open all year
Fee: Free
Parking: Available
Access: A 10-minute walk from Michi no Eki Wajima Furatto Homu

■When you need a break from strolling around Wajima, head for this footbath fed by a hot spring
This free footbath uses undiluted water that comes directly from the hot spring that feeds the inns and other facilities inside Wajima City. It's located very close to Wajima Asaichi and Wajima Kobo Nagaya, with its rows of Wajima lacquer ware workshops, and is a gathering place for many different people, from tourists who need a break from shopping for souvenirs to neighborhood grannies and local fathers finished with the day's work.
Yurari's special feature is the temperature of the hot water that pours out in an unending stream. The water of the Wajima hot spring is about 60 degrees centigrade, and this is cooled to a slightly hot 42-43 degrees centigrade by an outside cooling tower. Water at this temperature is apparently very effective at promoting blood circulation, which helps flush the body of waste products. You can also try drinking the hot spring water from the faucet outside. Refresh your body and your soul at this efficacious hot spring!

Opened in 2006. The inside, constructed largely of wood, is kept in immaculate shape.
Opened in 2006. The inside, constructed largely of wood, is kept in immaculate shape.
    The cooling tower cools the hot spring water. You can feel the true volume of the hot spring water.
The cooling tower cools the hot spring water. You can feel the true volume of the hot spring water.

Kaiyu Noto no Sho

Famed for its Japanese-style space and onsen water that's slippery to the touch


Address: 72 Tsurugaike, Ohno-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-22-0213
Website: http://www.notonosho.co.jp/
Rates: 1 night (with 2 meals) from 25,350 yen
Parking: Available
Access: About 30 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange
 
■This tatami-matted inn feels great to bare feet
This inn is located so that the Sea of Japan is right in front of your eyes. From the windows of each guest room and the windows all over the inn you can see the ever-changing faces of the sea. The interior of the inn is decorated on the theme of "The harmony of lacquer, washi Japanese paper, and tatami mats," and all of the floors, including in the lobby and corridors, is covered in tatami mats. The wonderful fragrance of the tatami mats is everywhere, and the decorations are lacquer ware, washi and the flowers of the season. The space is truly a harmonious and peaceful one.
The onsen is fed by a natural hot spring, the waters of which are said to heal the wounds of wild boars that bathe in them. The onsen is popular for its healing properties, leaving skin looking beautiful and feeling soft and silky.
The evening meal is a choice between Kaiseki cuisine (dainty and refined Japanese dishes) or Robatayaki cuisine(grilled bounty of the sea and mountains). Eating food prepared from Noto ingredients on Wajima lacquer ware dishes offers a true taste of the local hospitality.

   

Noto Monzen Family Inn View Sunset

The futuristic architectural style of this hotel draws the eye.
Drop by the adjacent building and immerse yourself in the onsen there.


Address: 29-58 Sendai, Monzen-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-42-2050
Website: http://www12.ocn.ne.jp/~view-sun/
Hours: Check-in 15:00, check-out 10:00
Rates: 1 night (with 2 meals) Japanese-style room from 11,700yen, Western-style room from 12,225  
           yen (based on double occupancy)
           1 night (with breakfast) Japanese-style room from 6,450 yen, 1 night (without meals)
           Japanese-style room from 5,400 yen (limited to Internet reservation for weekdays)
Parking: 100 spaces
Access: About 20 minutes by car from the Noto Yuryo (Noto Toll Road) Anamizu Interchange
 
■Relax in an onsen while watching the setting sun
This futuristic building is a landmark, and is located on high ground, where you have a panoramic view of the Sea of Japan. As the name suggests, you'll have a beautiful view of the setting sun from this hotel, either from the viewing platform or the viewing corridor called the Pedestrian Deck. Like the building, which is meant to represent the Mandala, each guest room has a unique design. Select from a Japanese room that makes clever use of straight and curved lines for a modern look, a Japanese Western style room that is simple but still gives the essence of Japan, and a detached cottage that can accommodate up to 7 people.
The next-door Monzen Jin-nobi no Yu is an onsen with water that contains a lot of radon. It's built on a high spot to provide a great view of the Sea of Japan, so you can relax in the outdoor bath while watching the setting sun or the lights of night fishermen. Let the hot water an dramatic scenery wash away the weariness of travel.

Japanese western style room
Japanese western style room
  Large public bath
Large public bath
  Outdoor bath
Outdoor bath

Wajima Sushi Dokoro Shinpuku

This sushi restaurant uses only the freshest seafood delivered directly from the port.


Address: 5-41-23 Kawai-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-22-8133
Website: http://www.wajima.or.jp/shinpuku/
Hours: 11:30 - 14:00, 17:00 - 22:00
Closed: Irregularly
Parking: Available
Access: A 15-minute walk from Michi no Eki Wajima Furatto Homu; about 30 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange
 
A complete selection of local seafood. English menu available. Get a taste of the freshest seafood caught from the waters around the Noto Peninsula at this sushi restaurant. Select from many dishes that feature seasonal ingredients, drink locally brewed sake with them, and finally enjoy sushi made with locally caught fish - that's the fashionable way to enjoy yourself!
The specialty of this restaurant is the Asa-ichi Don (2500 yen), full of fresh seafood, delivered directly from the local port and served on rice. You never know which fish you'll be eating any one day - that's part of the anticipation! The rice is topped with about 15-16 different ingredients, including very slightly sweet homemade egg omelet, sure to whet any appetite. The bowls are made of Wajima lacquer ware, the rice is the Noto Hikari brand, a large-grained rice with little moisture that's perfect for sushi, and even the soy sauce is produced locally. The restaurant pays great attention to detail, so you can truly get a taste of local products here.
The bowls are about 3 times the size of regular bowls, so you can ask the chef to adjust the volume of rice for you. For women, about half the full amount of rice should be perfect. The menu is available in English, so you can eat there with no worries.

Miso soup served with the Asa-ichi Don. The one shown in the photo contains kajime (a type of seaweed).
Miso soup served with the Asa-ichi Don. The one shown in the photo contains kajime (a type of seaweed).
  Large-grained Noto Hikari rice has a pleasantly chewy texture, and becomes sweeter as it is chewed.
Large-grained Noto Hikari rice has a pleasantly chewy texture, and becomes sweeter as it is chewed.
  Japanese style seats are also available, in addition to the counter seats.
Japanese style seats are also available, in addition to the counter seats.

Notomae Kouzushi

At this sushi restaurant you can enjoy a wide variety of seafood from the Noto Peninsula.


Address: 37-4 Omachi, Anamizu-machi, Hosu-gun, Ishikawa Prefecture
Phone: 0768-52-2114
Website: http://www.kouzushi.com/
Hours: 11:30 - 14:00, 16:30 - 23:30
Closed: Wednesdays
Parking: Available
Access: About 5 minutes by car from the Noto Yuryo (Noto Toll Road) Anamizu Interchange
 
■Donburi, sushi, and more - get your fill of seasonal seafood from Noto.
The display case has a wide range of seasonal seafood from the Noto Peninsula. The restaurant only has thirteen counter seats, as the owner likes to make sushi while talking with customers. The closeness between the chef and the customer is also an important ingredient for good sushi.
A donburi (a bowl of rice with a topping), prepared with seafood from the Noto Peninsula, is recommended. In particular, the Konpaku-don (2,000 yen) is popular, and it contains more than fifteen kinds of ingredients from Noto, with a special focus on locally caught fresh fish. The rice, also locally harvested, has a pleasantly chewy texture and goes perfectly with the fish. The 3,800-yen nigiri-zushi (hand-pressed sushi) set (called "jimono nigiri") is also recommended, and it consists of 16 pieces of sushi prepared using the local ingredients of the day. The saba-oshi-zushi (wild mackerel sushi pressed in a square mold, 1,500 yen) and the kaisen-don (bowl of rice topped with fresh seafood, 1,600 yen), which is good value, are perfect for lunch.

The owner doing computer work during his spare time. His website was awarded first prize at the Ishikawa Net Shop Contest 2008.
The owner doing computer work during his spare time. His website was awarded first prize at the Ishikawa Net Shop Contest 2008.
  The saba-oshi-zushi are meticulously prepared one at a time using carefully-selected mackerels. This is a very popular item.
The saba-oshi-zushi are meticulously prepared one at a time using carefully-selected mackerels. This is a very popular item.
 

Thatched house Mii no Sato

Enjoy rice bowl dishes and set meals loaded with fresh locally grown vegetables in this old folk house with a thatched roof.


Address: 14-2 Urushihara, Mii-machi Koizumi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-26-1181
Hours: 9:00 – 17:00
Closed: Tuesdays
Parking: 20 spaces
Access: About 10 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange

■Rice bowl dishes loaded with freshly collected ingredients
A 150-year-old folk house with a thatched roof has been dismantled and reconstructed in Wajima City's Mii district. The inside has been preserved as before, with earthen floors and an irori fireplace as seen in a typical old-style folk house, and because of this it's possible to get a glimpse into the lives of the former residents. In the afternoon it operates as a restaurant. If you make reservations, you can also experience such crafts as papermaking and plant dying.
Kayate don is a rice bowl dish mixed with beaten eggs, named after the "kaya" in kayabuki (thatched) and the "te" in ate, Ishikawa Prefecture's prefectural tree. It costs 700 yen, and the ingredients change daily. The main ingredients, seasonal vegetables and rice, are all grown in Mii. The menu is simple, but it allows you to taste the true sweetness and flavor of the ingredients. The Yamazato Teishoku (set meal) costs 800 yen, and is also prepared with generous amounts of Mii-grown ingredients. The ingredients harvested directly from the earth are healthy as well. Eating in this thatched roof private house, which has stood unchanged for so many years, gives the meal a wonderful flavor.

   

Wajima Yabu Honten

Freshly ground, freshly kneaded, freshly cooked - a soba restaurant that sticks to the basics.


Address: 4-bu 45 Waichi, Kawaicho, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-22-2266
Hours: 11:30 - 15:00, 17:00 - 20:30
Closed: Tuesdays
Parking: 10 spaces

■Devoted to hand-kneading
Yabu Honten is located on Waichi Street, one street over from Wajima City's Asaichi Street. Every day, buckwheat grown in Wajima and Fukui is ground in a stone mortar to produce just enough homemade flour to make that day's soba. The merit of this restaurant is its freshly ground, freshly kneaded, freshly cooked soba.
The slightly thin noodles have a bit of an edge, and a firm feel when you bite into them. The broth for use with cold noodles is made from high-quality dried bonito, and is clear with a great deal of flavor. It brings out the flavor of the soba perfectly. One of the famous sights in Wajima in the winter is the phenomenon known as nami no hana, or wave flowers - frothy winter waves. The Nami no Hana soba was created as an image of that froth, which is popular tourism feature in winter in Noto, using grated Japanese radish and small shrimp. At 1,000 yen, it's very popular with tourists. Ippuku soba (400 yen) is a hot soba in a broth made from dried mackerel and high-quality dried bonito, and the size is just right for a snack.

Soba is prepared in several different ways in this Soba-zukushi at 2,300 yen
Soba is prepared in several different ways in this Soba-zukushi at 2,300 yen
  In one corner of the restaurant is a shelf with soba-related books
In one corner of the restaurant is a shelf with soba-related books
 

Noto Teshigotoya

With no regard to time, this soba is made completely by hand


Address: Sojiji dori, Monzencho, Wajima City
Hours: 11:00 - 16:00
Closed: Tuesdays (the following day if Tuesday is a national holiday)
Parking: 5 spaces
 
■Chewy noodles that slip down your throat
Teshigotoya was originally started by the Hoshino family, who ran a tofu shop that had sold tofu to Sojiji temple for over 100 years. Currently the second son, Keisuke, makes the soba noodles. He uses fragrant buckwheat flour from Fukushima and Fukui that is ground with the husks still on. Although the noodles are thin, they are very chewy, and the flavor hasn't changed since the shop was originally opened.
 
■From the serving dishes to the ingredients, Noto is scattered everywhere
Hot soba noodles in broth with homemade soymilk are 840 yen, while 100% buckwheat soba noodles are 900 yen. This shop's noodles are slippery and slide right down your throat. Other choices are available, including soba served in lacquer ware dishes made by the late Isaburo Kado, a famous lacquer artist who has received high praise both in Japan and overseas. And as the name implies (teshigoto means made by hand), the noodles are handmade for a unique taste.
 
■A restaurant that will be around forever
Keisuke's dream is that 15 or 30 years from now, Teshigotoya will still be in business. "If that can provide some liveliness to the town, I will be happy," he said straightforwardly.

The soba served on a shallow dish (840 yen) is usually Nihachi soba (80% buckwheat flour and 20% wheat flour). It is spread on leaves collected in the mountains from Ishikawa Prefecture
The soba served on a shallow dish (840 yen) is usually Nihachi soba (80% buckwheat flour and 20% wheat flour). It is spread on leaves collected in the mountains from Ishikawa Prefecture's prefectural tree, the ate.
  From the left: Hoshino, Keisuke, and employees Hashitani and Yamaguchi.
From the left: Hoshino, Keisuke, and employees Hashitani and Yamaguchi.
 

Noto Sojiji Soba-zen

Traditional Monzen soba eaten with natural yama-imo (Japanese yam)


Address: Toge Wa-1, Monzen-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-42-2950
Hours: 11:00-17:00
Closed: Wednesdays
Parking: 40 spaces

■Soba that maintains traditional techniques
This soba originated in Monzen-machi, the town centered around Sojiji temple, which was founded about 700 years ago and was the head temple of the Soto sect of Buddhism. At that time, people who came to worship at the temple were treated to Monzen soba. Unlike most soba, which is made by adding water to buckwheat flour, Monzen soba uses only grated yama-imo (Japanese yam) to make the dough, which is then kneaded and shaped into noodles. This yama-imo grows naturally in the mountains, and is called Jinenjo.
 
■A flavor grown in the nature of Noto
The staff at Soba-zen are all local people who grew up eating Monzen soba. This soba is still hand-kneaded every morning using traditional techniques. Experts go into the mountains to harvest wild yama-imo, which is grated with the skin on and added to buckwheat flour made from unpolished grain from Noto. The stock is also homemade in a large pot with lots of konbu (kelp) and katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes). The hot soba, which is much more fragrant, is highly recommended. With reservations, you can also participate in soba kneading, from 3,000 yen.

Kakesoba Gozen 1,000 yen. The hot soba is served together with dishes made from fresh seasonal ingredients.
Kakesoba Gozen 1,000 yen. The hot soba is served together with dishes made from fresh seasonal ingredients.
  The staff of Soba-zen. From the right: Manager Nushi Yasunori, chef Azuma Makiko, and soba kneader Morishita Shin.
The staff of Soba-zen. From the right: Manager Nushi Yasunori, chef Azuma Makiko, and soba kneader Morishita Shin.
 

Mori Soba

Freshly kneaded soba and Noto mountain food and seafood


Address: 7-8 Kawajima, Anamizumachi, Hosu-gun
Phone: 0768-52-0025
Hours: 10:00 - 15:00, 17:00 - 21:00 (Last order at 20:30)
Closed: 2nd and 4th Tuesdays (the following day if it falls on a national holiday)
Parking: 11 spaces
 
■A casual soba restaurant at the foot of a bridge
The Sakaebashi bridge crosses the river that flows through the town of Anamizu, and at the foot of this bridge you'll find Mori Soba. The rather thin soba is prepared fresh every day using fragrant and tasty buckwheat flour from the Kurohime plateau in Nagano prefecture. Attention is paid to details, such as the refreshing stock and locally produced soy sauce used. Homemade udon noodles and a variety of set menus are also available. It's known as a comfortable place for a family to get a great meal.
 
■A shop that gathers the flavors of Noto
The restaurant owner, Morita Kazuya, was born and raised in Anamizu, and it's very important to him that local ingredients are used. The onions, rice, and yama-imo used are all locally produced. From Nov. 20 to the end of April, freshly harvested oysters are also on the menu. There's a fireplace inside the restaurant for roasting oysters, and the seasonal oyster soba (700 yen) and full-course oyster meal (3,990 yen, reservations required) are also popular.

Lots of sticky Japanese yam is placed on top of the soba. Yamakake soba 1,000 yen.
Lots of sticky Japanese yam is placed on top of the soba. Yamakake soba 1,000 yen.
  The restaurant
The restaurant's owner, Morita Kazuya, is also very knowledgeable about Japanese sake, and if you ask, he might even bring out some of his best bottles.
 

Open Café Ki no Koe

A café inside a temple.
Take a short rest in this corridor café with round windows.


Address: Kyoganji temple, O-123 Kanakura, Machino-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-32-0892
Hours: 10:00 - 17:00
Closed: Wednesdays and Thursdays, irregularly from December to March (inquire beforehand)
Parking: 20 spaces
Access: About 30 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange; about 25 minutes by car from Noto Airport

■A café inside a temple
Terraced rice fields spread out in the Kanakura area of Wajima City. In this quiet mountain community, the open café Ki no Koe is located inside this temple, which was built about 600 years ago. It's found in the corridor with circular windows that connects the main temple building and the priests' quarters. If you plan to eat there, the Onigiri Lunch (reservations required) at 800 yen is recommended. It includes onigiri rice balls made from rice harvested from the local terraced rice fields and Kodai rice, and comes with traditional Kanakura foods and side dishes with lots of vegetables. Be sure to give the thanks to the land for this meal, which is good for both body and soul.
The café is managed by the wife of the priest of Kyoganji temple, Fumie Hyuga. "I want people to taste the local ingredients," says this former nutritionist. She makes good use of her experience in making homemade pizzas and cakes. Food preparation doesn't begin until an order is received, you'll naturally have to wait. Leave your watch at home and plan for a leisurely meal.

This old water mill is a symbol of the Kanakura district.
This old water mill is a symbol of the Kanakura district.
  The Kodai rice is also grown in Kanakura. The Onigiri Lunch changes daily.
The Kodai rice is also grown in Kanakura. The Onigiri Lunch changes daily.
 

Teahouse Wafuan

The teahouse of the time-honored Japanese sweets shop, famous for its Maruyubeshi, a specialty of Wajima.


Address: 4-bu 98 Kawai-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-22-9555
Website: http://yubeshi.jp/index.html
Hours: 9:00 - 17:00
Closed: Open 365 days a year
Parking: Use the Asaichi parking lot
Access: About an 13-minute walk from Michi no Eki Wajima Furatto Ho-mu
 
■Breathe in the culture of Wajima in this teahouse
Yubeshi is a representative sweet of Wajima. The pulp of a yuzu (Japanese citrus fruit) is removed, and replaced with sweetened mochi (sticky rice cake). The yuzu is then steamed and dried slowly for about six months. In 1910, Yubeshi Sohonke Nakauraya was founded, and this traditional sweets shop has continued to use yuzu to create a variety of sweets since then. Wafuan is on the 2nd floor of that shop.
A set menu that includes Maruyubeshi and your choice of coffee, tea or green tea runs 700 yen. The sweetness of the thinly sliced Maruyubeshi lingers amid the bittersweet taste and fragrance of the yuzu.
The charm of Wafuan is the local style of the space. The materials for the interior decorations are all from Wajima. The panels decorating the ceiling and walls are lacquered. The coffee and sweets serving containers are all Wajima lacquer ware. In this teahouse, you can really feel the history of this lacquer-based culture.

   

Sabo Sanchome

An orthodox coffee house on Asaichi Street.


Address: Asaichi Street, Kawai-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-22-5793
Hours: 7:00 - 16:00
Closed: The 10th and 25th of each month
Parking: Use the Asaichi parking lot
Access: About a 15-minute walk from the Michi no Eki Wajima Furatto Ho-mu
 
■An oasis on Asaichi Street
 Many street stalls line Wajima's Asaichi Street. It's popular with tourists, and they throng the street, but amidst all this bustle, you'll find Sabo Sanchome. Take one step inside, and it's as though you've entered another world from busy Asaichi Street. Most of the wood in the shop is mahogany, and jazz music fills the calm atmosphere.
The shop was opened 36 years ago. Coffee is of course the star of the menu. The coffee beans are roasted and ground inside the shop, and the water used to make the coffee is drawn from an underground well using a special pump. In the summer, you can taste a cup of cold-brew coffee using the water dripper in the center of the table. This coffee is slowly, carefully brewed overnight; only 25 cups are served a day. The shop master puts all of his experience and consideration into each cup of coffee he prepares.
If you need a break from shopping or strolling around, the cake set is an excellent choice. Select from 10 different types of cake, and add a cup of coffee for 700 yen. The coffee is made from an original blend of 5 types of beans for a smooth coffee without bitterness.

   

Wajima Lacquerware

Renowned around the world as amongst the finest Japanese lacquerware


■Lacquerware made through elaborate artisanship
Wajima lacquerware is highly rated both within Japan and overseas, and has a long history. During the Edo period, merchants travelled throughout the country and the lacquerware became a part of people's everyday lives.
The process of making a piece of Wajima lacquerware involves over 100 operations from wood carving to finishing. The entire process is carried out by hand by artisans. Each item is produced on a division-of-labor basis by specialized artisans, each of whom perform just one operation within the process, such as wood turning or lacquer coating. Wajima lacquerware is created through elaborate artisanship, has beautiful shapes and is robust, due to the reinforcement of fragile parts by applying cloth and several layers of lacquer coating, as has delicate decorations such as maki-e (gold relief) and chinkin (gold inlay).