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Hot Springs / Public Baths / Footbaths

Wajima Hot Spring Footbath Yurari

This luxurious hot spring uses the gushing hot water just as it is. 


Address: 4-169 Kawai-machi, Wajima City
Phone: 0768-23-1146 (Wajima City Hall Commerce Department Tourism Section)
Website: http://www.city.wajima.ishikawa.jp/kankou/yurari.html
Hours: 6:00 – 22:00; Open all year
Fee: Free
Parking: Available
Access: A 10-minute walk from Michi no Eki Wajima Furatto Homu

■When you need a break from strolling around Wajima, head for this footbath fed by a hot spring
This free footbath uses undiluted water that comes directly from the hot spring that feeds the inns and other facilities inside Wajima City. It's located very close to Wajima Asaichi and Wajima Kobo Nagaya, with its rows of Wajima lacquer ware workshops, and is a gathering place for many different people, from tourists who need a break from shopping for souvenirs to neighborhood grannies and local fathers finished with the day's work.
Yurari's special feature is the temperature of the hot water that pours out in an unending stream. The water of the Wajima hot spring is about 60 degrees centigrade, and this is cooled to a slightly hot 42-43 degrees centigrade by an outside cooling tower. Water at this temperature is apparently very effective at promoting blood circulation, which helps flush the body of waste products. You can also try drinking the hot spring water from the faucet outside. Refresh your body and your soul at this efficacious hot spring!

Opened in 2006. The inside, constructed largely of wood, is kept in immaculate shape.
Opened in 2006. The inside, constructed largely of wood, is kept in immaculate shape.
    The cooling tower cools the hot spring water. You can feel the true volume of the hot spring water.
The cooling tower cools the hot spring water. You can feel the true volume of the hot spring water.

Tsumakoibune-no-Yu

A free footbath with a superb view of Nanao Bay and Notojima Island


Address: 1-1 Hibari, Wakura-machi, Nanao City
Phone: 0767-62-1555 (Wakura Onsen Tourism Association)
Hours: 7:00-19:00
Fee: Free
Closed: January 10 – End of February
Parking: Available
Access: About 7 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Wakura Interchange
 
■Refresh yourself with the sea view and the hot spring
Tsumakoibune-no-Yu is a part of Yuttari Park, a seaside facility overlooking Nanao Bay. This is located in the Wakura hot-spring resort area, which is bristling with hotels and Japanese inns. Anyone can use this footbath for free. The clear and colorless hot-spring water comes from the source of Wakura Onsen. Soaking your feet for ten minutes will warm not only the feet but also the whole body, relieving the tiredness from walking around.
Perhaps the greatest charm of the facility is its location. The long bathtub, laterally facing the seashore, gives you a view of Nanao Bay and Notojima Island directly in front of you, wherever you are seated. The area can be enjoyed not only on fine days, but also when the sky is cloudy, which is common for the region, as this gives a relaxed feeling. This is a special place within Wakura Onsen resort, where visitors can enjoy both the hot springs and the sea view at the same time.

   

Michi no Eki Korogaki no Sato Shika

This roadside station contains shops that sell locally grown vegetables and rice, as well as facilities such as an onsen and footbath.


Address: 10 Aza Sueyoshi-shin-honmukai, Shika-machi, Hakui-gun, Ishikawa Prefecture
Phone: 0767-32-4831 (Michi no Eki Shunsai Kan)
Website: http://www.hrr.mlit.go.jp/road/miti_eki/each_folder/shika/shika.html
Hours / Closed: Differ according to the facility
Parking: Available
Access: About 5 minutes by car from the Noto Yuryo (Noto Toll Road) Nishiyama Interchange

This Michi no Eki is located on National Highway 249 in Hakui City, and is used by drivers and local residents as well. The reason for this is the full range of facilities available. Locally grown vegetables and rice, as well as processed goods and seafood are sold in the Michi no Eki Shunsai Kan, while the traditional culture of the surrounding area is explained in the Chiiki no Bunka Kan. Right next door are such facilities as Aqua Park Shi-On, where the dark reddish-brown water, slippery to the touch, gushes into the baths. Once you come here, you'll want to go back every day.
The free footbaths outside are always popular and crowded. They're roofed, so you can enjoy them safely in rain or snow. All you need is a towel to enjoy the onsen as often as you like.

* A Michi no Eki is...a rest area on a national highway that is registered with the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. In addition to parking and restrooms, they contain stores that sell local specialty items, restaurants and other facilities, to make driving more fun.

Aqua Park Shi-On
 10:00 - 23:00 (Pool open until 22:00, food served from 11:00 - 23:00) Closed on the 3rd Tuesday of every month)

Michi no Eki Shunsai Kan
 9:00 - 18:30  (Until 18:00 from November to February) Closed Tuesdays

Chiiki no Bunka Kan
 10:00 - 17:00, Closed every 3rd Tuesday of the month

   

Wakura Onsen Soyu (public hot-spring bath)

Wakura hot springs were discovered about 1,200 years ago.
The "soyu", located roughly in the center of the town, is a nonresidential public bathhouse.


Address: Wa-5-1, Wakura-machi, Nanao City
Phone: 0767-62-2221
Website: http://www.wakura.co.jp/
Hours: 7:00-22:00
Entry fee: Middle school students and older: 480 yen
Parking: Available
Access: About 10 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Wakura Interchange
 
■Non-residential hot-spring baths
According to legend, Wakura Onsen was discovered when someone saw a wounded egret trying to heal itself. The hot springs have been carefully conserved since a long time ago. During the Edo period, for example, the hot springs were maintained by the Maeda clan, lords of the Kaga domain. A soyu is a public bathhouse, and visitors can enjoy the Wakura hot springs without needing to stay at a hotel or a Japanese inn.
The main component of the water in Wakura Onsen is sodium chloride. The soyu has various facilities to help visitors get the most out of the hot water, which contains abundant natural minerals. The baths' design is based on Ryugu-jo, the undersea palace of a dragon king. In addition to large bathtubs, there are saunas, cold-water baths, and vibration baths. Each of the men's and women's baths is equipped with an outdoor pool made of stone, which makes them have a different atmosphere from the indoor baths.

This is a “walking bath”, which is a footbath that people walk through. Perfect for relieving fatigue from walking around.
This is a “walking bath”, which is a footbath that people walk through. Perfect for relieving fatigue from walking around.
  Soyu’s hot-spring eggs are made using water from a special tap. They are 50 yen each.
Soyu’s hot-spring eggs are made using water from a special tap. They are 50 yen each.
  Towels are also available at a price of 200 yen each, so you don’t have to bring your own bathing set.
Towels are also available at a price of 200 yen each, so you don’t have to bring your own bathing set.

Noto Yanagidaso

Hot springs surrounded by greenery in the mountains.
Accommodation is also available.


Address: 1 Aza Yanagida, Noto-cho, Hosu-gun, Ishikawa Prefecture
Phone: 0768-76-1550
Website: http://www.yanagidasou.com
Hours: 7:30 – 21:30 (from 14:00 on Mondays), last entry at 21:00
Bathing fee: adults 400 yen
Closed: Open every day
Parking: Available
Access: About 60 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange 
 
■Accommodation available. Enjoy high-quality spring water.
Noto Yanagidaso is a public inn located in the area formerly known as Yanagida Village, which was the only municipality without coast in the Noto Peninsula. The Japanese style building with black roof tiles blends in with the surrounding greenery, providing a tranquil atmosphere. The bath, open from 7:30, invites visitors to stop by for hot springs from early morning.
The clear and colorless hot-spring water of Yanagida Onsen, coming from the in-house source, feels slippery to the touch. Containing sodium sulfate, the hot water seems to cling to the skin to warm the body up from the core. The words by the reception clerk, “Some people even come to take the bath twice a day,” are quite convincing. With the green landscape beyond the window, the clean baths provide a comfortable and relaxing atmosphere. Also, the hot spring water is drinkable and warms the body from inside.
Shampoo and body-wash are provided in the baths. Washcloths (sold at 150 yen) and bath towels (rental at 100 yen) are also available at the front desk. Therefore, you don’t need special preparation to take a hot-spring bath here.
If you want to luxuriate in the hot spring, stay here overnight. Rates are from 7,290 yen for an adult for one night accommodation with dinner and breakfast, and from 4,455 yen without dinner and breakfast. The Japanese-style rooms provide peaceful and relaxing space.

The surrounding thicket greenery can be viewed from the guest rooms.
The surrounding thicket greenery can be viewed from the guest rooms.
  Home-grown ginkgo nuts are sold at the shop inside the facility. Wild vegetables are also sold in spring.
Home-grown ginkgo nuts are sold at the shop inside the facility. Wild vegetables are also sold in spring.
  The dressing room represents the concept of the facility: “An old yet clean inn”.
The dressing room represents the concept of the facility: “An old yet clean inn”.

Jomon Mawaki Onsen (Hot Spring)

From this onsen, you can see both the Sea of Japan and historic Jomon ruins.


Address: 19-39 Aza Mawaki, Noto-cho, Hosu-gun, Ishikawa Prefecture
Phone: 0768-62-4567
Hours: 13:00 – 21:00
Closed: Mondays
Parking: Available
Access: About 50 minutes by car from the Noto Yuryo (Noto Toll Road) Anamizu Interchange
 
■This hot spring inside a park containing historic ruins boasts excellent views
The Mawaki ruins are one of the Hokuriku region’s largest examples of Jomon historic ruins, and have been designated a national historic landmark. Jomon Mawaki Onsen is located inside Mawaki Iseki Koen (Mawaki Ruins Park), where you will also find such attractions as the Mawaki Iseki Jomon Kan (Jomon-Mawaki Ruins Museum), which houses artifacts from the ruins, and KamuKamu Land, a playground that uses the sloping ground to great effect.
The building is reminiscent of Jomon houses, and there are two bath facilities inside. One is the Asunaro no Yu, which symbolizes masculinity. The dynamic design features a 12m-tall open ceiling space, through which an asunaro (hiba arborvitae) tree grows. The Iraka no Yu, on the other hand, uses the curves and smooth surfaces of rocks to symbolize femininity. Both are equipped with outdoor baths that use the hot spring water in undiluted form. During the day, bathers can view the Sea of Japan and the Mawaki ruins, while at night they can see the lights of fishing boats below and a sea of stars above. Relax both your body and soul.

KamuKamu Land, a park that uses the hilly terrain.
KamuKamu Land, a park that uses the hilly terrain.
  The onsen is connected by a corridor to the Jomon Mawaki PorePore lodgings.
The onsen is connected by a corridor to the Jomon Mawaki PorePore lodgings.
 

Ebisu Yu

This retro sento (public bath) in located on the tip of the Noto Peninsula.
The water is heated with firewood, in the same style as old sento.


Address: 19-45 Shoin, Shoin-machi, Suzu City
Phone: 0768-82-0402
Hours: 14:00 – 20:00
Fee: adults 420 yen
Closed: Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays
Parking: None
Access: About 90 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange
 
■A sento where Ebisu–sama (the god of fishing and commerce) greets customers
This sento is only open three days a week. But the people in the town have been waiting patiently, and flock to the door as soon as it opens. Ebisu Yu sento, located on the tip of the Noto Peninsula in Suzu, is very well known among onsen (hot spring) enthusiasts. It still looks like sento did back when people took baths at sento as a matter of course. At the entrance there’s an illustration of Ebisu, holding a large red sea bream and laughing, and in the bath room, there’s a picture of Mt. Fuji made out of tiles. The lockers have large numbers on them, and there are baskets to put your clothes in after you take them off. Everything seems to have been taken great care of and have its own style. Of course, as in a traditional sento, there are no showers. Use the hot and cold faucets to adjust the water to the temperature you like, and slowly wash your sweat away.
Because the water is heated by firewood, the proprietress bustles back and forth between the attendant’s booth and the boiler room. If a voice calls out from the bath, “The water’s a bit lukewarm,” back she goes to the boiler room. Attention to doing things the traditional way is more important than efficiency – that’s the charm of Ebisu Yu.

   

Minato Yu

Located in the center of a port town. Enjoy a hot bath while gazing at a mural of Mt.Fuji.
An excellent, old-style Japanese sento.


Address: Ushitsu-shin, Noto-cho, Hosu-gun, Ishikawa Prefecture
Hours: 14:00 – 22:30
Fee: Adults 420 yen
Closed: Days with an 8 in them
Access: About 60 minutes by car from the Noetsu Expressway Noto Airport Interchange

■A place for socializing and bathing in Minatocho
Minato Yu was built in 1948 and the original building is still standing. Here, the fishermen and working women of Ushitsu, a major port town in Noto, are able to relax for a short space of time. As you pass through the short curtain hanging at the entrance, a snug changing room and bath room appear before you. Here is where the local residents gather to socialize. As they leave the bath, talking to each other animatedly, steam rises from their heated bodies.
A tile mural of Mt. Fuji, a standard sight in traditional Japanese sento, is of course present. It's a truly luxurious feeling to soak in a hot bath while gazing at Mt. Fuji.
The old building, the tile mural, the fans in the ceiling and the massage chair - all of these remain unchanged from the old days. And just as in the old days, firewood and sawdust is burned to heat the water for the bath. Here you can find the history of Japan's sento.